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The Fabric of the Cosmos- A Review

  The Fabric of the Cosmos   by Brian Greene Reviewed by   Geoffrey W. Sutton I suppose my fascination with science began in childhood when the Russians first sent a rocket into space. I was fortunate to have a workbench in our basement where I messed with various science kits and old radios. Soon, I would be fascinated by High School science classes and the opportunity to build a simple computer. Although my path led to psychological science, I still enjoy reading the nonspecialist versions of the Big Picture like Greene’s The Fabric of the Cosmos . The Fabric of the Cosmos by Brian Greene is known for discussing several mind-bending concepts that challenge our everyday understanding of reality. Here are some of the most thought-provoking ideas explored in the book: 1. The Nature of Space and Time : Greene explores the fundamental structure of the cosmos, questioning the very nature of space and time. He delves into whether space is an entity and why time seems to have a
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Mastering Your Mind: A Guide to Rational Living

  Mastering Your Mind: A Guide to Rational Living By : Albert Ellis and Robert Harper Reviewed by Geoffrey W. Sutton PhD I was introduced to Albert Ellis’ theory of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy as a graduate student in 1974 by Professor Robert Dolliver III (1934 - 2021) at the University of Missouri. I had accumulated a number of courses in philosophy along with my focus on psychology thus, Ellis’ approach made a lot of sense to me. In my clinical practice, I found that many of my highly educated patients found the New Guide to Rational Living helpful. Following is a summary of the book. A New Guide to Rational Living by Albert Ellis and Robert Harper introduces the concepts of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) to the general public. In this self-help manual, Ellis provides strategies for thought balancing, also known as cognitive reframing. The book aims to help individuals overcome negative thoughts and emotions that hold them back in life. Here are the key concepts:

The Social Fabric of Scientific Trust: A Review of Naomi Oreskes' Why Trust Science?

    The Social Fabric of Scientific Trust:  A Review of Naomi Oreskes' Why Trust Science ?   Reviewed by Geoffrey W. Sutton   Recently, I have reconsidered a problem that emerged early in my career as a psychologist. By the time I was in graduate school, I began to hear clergy and other evangelicals attacking my profession. My graduate work was at the University of Missouri, was during the 1970s. The issue of psychology and Christianity was not discussed in my classes. Psychology is a science. We learned how to conduct experiments before we learned how to apply principles to the assessment and treatment of people struggling with various problems in living.   I soon learned from clergy and church friends of the low esteem they accorded my profession. Oreskes’ book offers some helpful thoughts on the general issue of trusting science and scientists. Her examples include psychology so, I found her ideas particularly helpful and think others interested in the cultural rejection of

Still Christian by David Gushee- A review

  Still Christian: Following Jesus Out of American Evangelicalism By David P. Gushee Reviewed by   Geoffrey W. Sutton In Still Christian: Following Jesus Out of American Evangelicalism , David P. Gushee offers a candid memoir that chronicles his spiritual journey within the American evangelical movement. This book is not merely a narrative of Gushee's life; it is a profound reflection on the challenges of maintaining personal integrity in the face of institutional pressures and societal expectations.   Gushee, a distinguished professor of Christian ethics, was born and raised a Roman Catholic. His transition to Southern Baptist evangelicalism marked a significant turn in his spiritual quest, one that would lead him to grapple with the complexities of faith, scholarship, and moral conviction. The book is laid out chronologically, allowing readers to follow Gushee's path from a zealous Baptist teenager to a respected academic and outspoken advocate for LGBTQ inclusion w

Stuck by Rufus - A Book Review

    Stuck: Why We Can’t (or Won’t) Move On     by Anneli Rufus   Reviewed by   Geoffrey W. Sutton In Stuck ,  Anneli Rufus explores the intriguing problem of our tendency to get stuck in many areas of our life. Whether it’s being trapped in the wrong relationship, career, or town, or simply struggling with stubborn habits, many of us find ourselves immobilized. Rufus combines interviews, personal anecdotes, and cultural criticism to explore the dreams we hold dear and the road to achieving them. When faced with the possibility of change, our minds play tricks on us. We convince ourselves that we “can’t make it” or that it’s “not worth the effort.” In a time of unprecedented freedom and opportunity, why do so many feel powerless and unsure? Rufus uncovers a complex web of potential causes, from fear and denial to societal messages that reinforce our helplessness. The book also shares stories of those who have broken free and those who have decided that where they are i

The Bible Now – A Book Review

  The Bible Now By Richard Elliott Friedman & Shawna Dolansky   2011 Reviewed by    Geoffrey W. Sutton In their thought-provoking book, The Bible Now , Friedman and Dolansky delve into the Hebrew Bible, exploring its relevance to contemporary social and political issues. The authors meticulously examine what the Bible actually says—or doesn’t say—about a wide range of topics, including homosexuality, abortion, women’s status, capital punishment, and environmental concerns . The Bible has long been a touchstone for moral and ethical debates, but it is often misused or misunderstood. Friedman and Dolansky aim to rectify this by shedding light on the biblical texts, revealing their true intent and context. Here are some key insights from their work: Homosexuality : Contrary to popular belief, the Bible does not clearly condemn homosexuality. While the story of Sodom is often cited, it does not specifically address same-sex relationships. Additionally, David’s lament

Can Christians Evolve? A Review of Thriving with Stone Age Minds

  Thriving with Stone Age Minds: Evolutionary Psychology, Christian Faith, and the Quest for Human Flourishing (BioLogos Books on Science and Christianity) By Justin L. Barrett   and Pamela Ebstyne King On AMAZON Reviewed by   Geoffrey W. Sutton I’m in the process of writing about irreconcilable differences between Christianity and psychology. Thriving with Stone Age Minds surprised me. Not only does Barrett affirm evolution but he explains evolutionary psychology and how it may relate to Christian theology. *** Thriving with Stone Age Minds: Evolutionary Psychology, Christian Faith, and the Quest for Human Flourishing by Justin L. Barrett delves into the intersection of evolutionary psychology, Christian theology, and human flourishing. In this thought-provoking work, Barrett and co-author Pamela Ebstyne King explore how our evolutionary past shapes our present minds, relationships, and behaviors. The book begins by acknowledging the controversy surrounding evolu